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Best practices

Public transport in Oslo

In recent years, there have been more people in Oslo traveling with public transport than by car. By 2020, all public transport in Oslo will use renewable energy, and all public transport will be electrified by 2028.

Public transport in Oslo

  • From 2007 to 2017, the number of trips using public transport has increased by 63 percent, from 228 million to 371 million journeys.
  • Public transportation in Oslo grew at a rate of 6.1 percent in 2017.
  • In 2017, 56 percent of public transport was powered by renewable energy.
  • By 2020, public transport in the Oslo metropolitan area will exclusively use renewable energy.
  • By 2028, public transport in the Oslo metropolitan area will be zero-emissions.

Strong growth

Public transport in Oslo constitutes a network of travel possibilities by train, tram, subway, bus and boat almost 24 hours per day. The subway and the train move the biggest numbers of travelers, primarily underground. On the surface, buses and trams are the main modes of transport, while the boats carry the commuters by sea.

In the past ten years, the number of trips made by public transport has increased by 63 percent, from 228 million to 371 million journeys. This growth is due to long-term, comprehensive investment, with predictable funding, which has offered more frequent departures and higher quality.

Has overtaken cars

Public transport both offers solutions to the challenge of how to ensure efficient accessibility, but also to how emissions from passenger transport can be reduced.

The usage of cars accounts for most of the emissions from passenger transport, while the amount of greenhouse gas emissions from public transport accounts for about four percent. In recent years, there have been more people in Oslo using public transport than cars.

Fossil free 2020

By 2020, public transport in Oslo will only use renewable energy. After that, all city buses will also have the Euro VI standard on their engines, which will significantly reduce both noise and local pollution.

The bus fleet accounts for more than 90 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions of Ruter, the public transport company in the counties of Oslo and Akershus. Boat traffic emits the remaining 10 percent.

By 2017, 56 percent of public transport was powered by renewable energy. 44 percent of bus production and seven percent of the energy usage of boats was renewable.

Emissons-free 2028

All public transport in the Oslo metropolitan area must be emissions-free by 2028. That will be beneficial for the climate, local environment, urban development and public health. In the long term, emissions-free solutions will also be the most cost effective. The trams and subways are already powered with renewable energy, and the electrification of bus and boat in Oslo is under way.

For the past seven years, Ruter has tested five hydrogen buses, resulting in water vapor as the only emission. In 2017, a two-year pilot started with six battery-powered buses. In 2019, 70 electric buses will be added, which will run on central bus routes in Oslo. This makes Oslo the leading electric bus city in the Nordic countries. In total, the Oslo metropolitan area will have 115 electric buses in 2019.

In 2019, the ferries between Oslo and Nesodden will be electrified. This is Norway's largest car-free passenger association, with 2.7 of in total 4.5 million boat trips. When these three boats are electric, 70 percent of the boat trips will be emissions-free.

By 2021, the ferries servicing the islands in the Inner Oslo Fjord from the Aker Brygge docks will also be electric.

Exceptional transport, such as minibuses and taxis, will be emissions-free in 2022, while the ambition is that all boats will be emissions-free by 2024.

All the 1200 buses running on Ruters lines will be emissions-free by 2028.

Source: Ruter

The Future of Travel