Go to content

The Toll Ring

In recent years, significant expansions in the public transport system, in Oslo, have been financed by a toll ring. The toll ring is also an important tool for traffic reduction, transition to zero-emission vehicles, GHG reductions and improved air quality.

Smart facts

  • a smart financing framework for public transport investments
  • public transport share increased from 21 to 32 %
  • car share decreased from 45 to 34 %.

Automated toll stations are located on all entry roads to Oslo. The City uses the toll ring to reduce congestion (figure 1) by charging people when passing. Revenues are used to facilitate more trips by public transport, bicycle and walking through investing in better infrastructure, and reducing air pollution, GHG emissions and noise.

Figure 1: Average number of cars passing through the Oslo toll ring per day in the period 1996-2014. After 2008, the number of cars that crossed the toll barrier fell, despite population growth. Part of the explanation is a tariff increase, combined with reduced fares on public transport.Figure 1: Average number of cars passing through the Oslo toll ring per day in the period 1996-2014. After 2008, the number of cars that crossed the toll barrier fell, despite population growth. Part of the explanation is a tariff increase, combined with reduced fares on public transport.

The toll ring as financing model

The toll ring and the Master transport plan for Oslo and Akershus (Oslo Package) constitute an important financing framework for public transport investments. When introduced in 1990, 10 % of toll ring revenues were used for public transport. Since then, the share has increased. Recently, a revised plan (Oslo Package3) was agreed upon, with a budget of approx. EUR 8 billion for the period 2017-2036. In Oslo, 93 % of the revenue will be earmarked for investments in public transport system, improved bicycle infrastructure and to promote walking reducing the number of fatalities and serious injuries by traffic, and reducing congestion. The result is that, between 2005 and 2015, the public transport share increased from 21 to 32 %, while the car share decreased from 45 to 34 %.

The Oslo Package 3 also sets a goal of a 15 % reduction in traffic by 2019, and emphasises the importance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution. The toll ring charges, starting from 2017, favours zero and low emission vehicles (figure 2), motivating a transition to cleaner vehicles. As a result, the air quality in Oslo is expected to significantly improve (figure 3).

Figure 2: Toll ring charges in Oslo

As a result of the revised Oslo Package 3, the toll ring charges for diesel and petrol vehicles will be significantly increased and favors vehicles with zero or low emissions of NO2. The revised price structure also includes congestion charging during rush hours. 

Current charges
Light duty vehiclesLight duty vehicles -zero emissionHeavy duty vehiclesHeavy duty vehicles - zero emission
€ 3.60€ 10.80
Revised Oslo Package 3 charges
Light duty vehicles -dieselLight duty vehicles - petrol and hybridLight duty vehicles - zero emissionHeavy duty vehicles - Euro V and olderHeavy duty vehicles - Euro VIHeavy duty vehicles - zero emission
Stage 1: March 1, 2017-December 31, 2017€ 5.2 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)€ 4.7 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)0€ 17.4 (+ € 3.3 during rush hours)€ 10.9 (+ € 3.3 during rush hours)0
Stage 2: January 1, 2018-December 31, 2019€ 5.2 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)€ 4.7 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)€ 1.1 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)€ 17.4 (+ € 3.3 during rush hours)€ 10.9 (+ € 3.3 during rush hours)0
Stage 3: January 1, 2020 →€ 5.2 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)€ 4.7 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)€ 2.2 (+ € 1.1 during rush hours)€ 17.4 (+ € 3.3 during rush hours)€ 10.9 (+ € 3.3 during rush hours)0

 

Figure 3.1: Annual mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in Oslo, calculated for the present situation 2014. Red color marks areas where the limit value for annual mean concentrations of NO2 is exceeded.Figure 3.1: Annual mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in Oslo, calculated for the present situation 2014. Red color marks areas where the limit value for annual mean concentrations of NO2 is exceeded.

Figure 3.2:  Annual mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in Oslo, calculated for 2022,  including the effects of the revised Oslo Package 3. Red color marks areas where the limit value for annual mean concentrations of NO2 is exceeded. Figure 3.2: Annual mean concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in Oslo, calculated for 2022, including the effects of the revised Oslo Package 3. Red color marks areas where the limit value for annual mean concentrations of NO2 is exceeded.